CURLING! WHERE TO SEE IT!

Watching the Olympic games in recent times, you will realize that among so many winter games, there is a particularly popular one called curling. This is a game that stands out in all formats, different from all other winter sports, both in how it is played and in how it was brought about. It is a mix of shuffleboard and bowling, all done on ice, mixed with the impeccable strategies of the game of chess. Curling is a game that features about two to four people, sliding large stone across ice towards a bull eyes about 126 feet away.

Taking a brief look into the history of curling, it can be dated back to the 126th century, although it is being relatively believed to be a new game but can be said to have originated from Scotland when farmers used large, smooth stones they found in local streams to play the game, right there on frozen marshes. In the 1750s, the game was brought to Canada by some Scottish immigrants, which later spread all through North America, and eventually getting to the United States in the 1830s. it will be a funny and surprising thing for you to know that a lot of people never knew that the game of curling was included in the original winter Olympic games in 1924, and later it disappeared for long years, and later returned in the year 1998, during the winter Olympics that was held in Nagano Japan.

Alaska State Curling Association

You may want to ask how this game is being played, well let me quickly explain how it is being played and where you can see it being played. Curling has 10 ends, or periods (depending on the name it called in the area where it is being played). Teams takes turns to slide a 42-pound polished granite stone across a sheet made of ice, all directed towards a bull’s eyes having four concentric circles which are about 12 feet in diameter. The bull’s house is normally called “the house”, while its centre is called “the tee”. At the end, each layer has just two shots to take, and points are earned by the team whose stones are closest to the tee when all of them had finished taking their shots. What makes this even more interesting it that some of the players may be aiming for the tee, while some players will deliberately aim at the opponent’s stone to make it move more farther away from the tee, but each of these moves solely depends on the strategies the players wish to employ.

Here are some of the curling clubs in the United States where you can see the game being played.

  • Alaska State Curling Association: Alaska, Hawaii, Alabama, Idaho, Michigan, New York, Tennessee, New Mexico, etc.
  • Grand National Curling Club: Arizona, Illinois, Minnesota, North Carolina, etc.
  • Great Lakes Curling Association: Colorado, Kentucky, Nebraska, Oregon, Washington, Kansas, Montana, Virginia, etc.
  • Mid-America Curling Association: Delaware, Louisiana, Nevada, Pennsylvania, West Virginia, Georgia, Maryland, New Jersey, South Carolina etc.